Hazelnut tahini lemon dip (fundukli tahin)

IMG_3155

As I’m cooking through the Please to the Table cookbook, I’m realizing that this blog is a bit of a misnomer. It was always my intent to cook Soviet food rather than just Russian (I’m technically Moldovian after all) but cooking through the book I realize how diverse each country’s food in the region really is.

For example, this recipe is for the hazelnut tahini dip, which is an Azerbaijani dish. I am realizing that tahini is quite a common ingredient in Azerbaijani cuisine, which appears to be much closer to a blend between Mediterranean and Middle Eastern, rather than “Russian.” [I’ve never had tahini during my childhood… until I moved to Israel!] Since Sovian Bites doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as Russian Bites, I’ll keep the blog name as is. But I just wanted to let you know why this dish may not be exactly what you expected “Russian” food to be. Because it’s not! 😉 I love how discovering all the tastes the former Soviet Union cuisine has to offer!!

On to this dish… This was a really quick appetizer I made for a party today. It’s got the tang of tahini, nuttiness of the hazelnuts and the brightness of lemon (the hazelnuts add a bit of texture too). I served it with pita chips but fresh veggies would be great as well. I think everyone enjoyed it. :)

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup hazelnuts
  • 3/4 cup tahini
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • juice of 2 large lemons
  • 1/2 cup water
  • salt and pepper, to taste

IMG_3107

1. Roast hazelnuts at 350* for about 7 minutes, until fragrant. Don’t burn them! 😆

Before:

IMG_3111

After:

IMG_3113

I know, I know… kind of hard to see. But they were toasty!

2. Rub the hazelnuts with a clean kitchen towel to remove the skins.

IMG_3114

They may not completely come off. Don’t worry if some skin remains in tact.

IMG_3121

3. Grind the hazelnuts in the food processor.

IMG_3125IMG_3129

4. Add the rest of the ingredients and process for another 30 seconds or so (add more water if needed, 1/2 cup was sufficient for me).

IMG_3138

Add salt and pepper to taste.

5. Serve…

IMG_3147

… taste one more time 😉

IMG_3154

… then remind yourself that you really need to leave some for the party.

All ready to go!

IMG_3159

IMG_3157

IMG_3164

7 comments to Hazelnut tahini lemon dip (fundukli tahin)

  • Yum! This sounds like a must try! Very cool variation of hummus.

  • Tiffany

    I loved this dish. I loved how the nutty flavor of the hazelnuts lent itself to the lemons, almost as if it were downplaying the sourness of the lemons. The texture was great, too – this sounds odd, but I just really liked how it felt against my tongue, lol. I’m a texture foodie, and this was a hit!

    I think it’s interesting that there is so much variation in food between the former satellite nations. I noticed in the Czech Republic that the food is very German-centric. It’s nothing like the food you post here, and yet the Czechs were also part of the Soviet Union. In a way, it makes me think of our country’s own cultural zones (“traditional” food here, citrusy-sweet foods in the south, and spicy in the southwest). There’s something to appreciate about each regional offering.

  • It’s very neat to see all the different flavors that were present in the former soviet union! this sounds lovely, and i’ll definitely be giving it a try :)

  • Just bookmarked this one for future use in a Russian dinner party!! I am gathering all my faves, and I think it will be cool because most people I know are not sure what kinds of foods are “Russian.”

  • Sounds delicious! I’ve never had a hazelnut dip before but I think I’ll really like this, especially with the tahini and lemon flavors.

  • Very interesting dip, I never heard of this one before. And glad to have found your website, many interesting recipes

  • Yum. I think what you’re mentioning above is to be expected since to some degree, there is often a little overlap from one country to another and flavors migrate.

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Follow Me



Check out my other blog: Healthy and Sane!